The Human Element in Fire Sprinkler Monitoring

Sprinkler Head in Facility

The Human Element in Fire Sprinkler Monitoring

Sprinkler Head in Facility

In a recent article from NFPA, it states, “three out of every five fire incidents where sprinklers fail to operate, the system has been shut off.” This is especially troubling because this can be easily fixed by added checks to the system.

Not all valves are supervised, so it is very important to make sure that after inspections or any other work, the valves are turned back on. Both contractors and staff have a part in making sure the valves are ready in case of an emergency.

For valves that are not supervised NPFA has certain allowances. “In lieu of electronic supervision, NFPA 13 also permits valves to be locked, sealed, and tagged to prevent unauthorized closing.” Seals must be checked weekly and locks monthly to assure no one has tampered with them.

The overall message of the article is that whether a valve is supervised or not, a visual check is truly the best way to assure that your system will work when it is called upon. Protegis Fire & Safety is equipped to help with your valve and sprinkler needs.  

1 NFPA – In Compliance | NFPA 13 – Monitoring the status of a sprinkler system by Brian O’Connor

Fire Escape Planning

Fire Escape Planning

This is Fire Prevention Week and one of the main topics this year is fire escape planning.  Plan Ahead! If a fire breaks out in your home, you may have only a few minutes to get out safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Everyone needs to know what to do and where to go if there is a fire.

SAFETY TIPS

  • MAKE a home escape plan. Draw a map of your home showing all doors and windows. Discuss the plan with everyone in your home.
  • KNOW at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily.
  • HAVE an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • PRACTICE your home fire drill at night and during the day with everyone in your home, twice a year.
  • PRACTICE using different ways out.
  • TEACH children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.
  • CLOSE doors behind you as you leave.

IF THE ALARM SOUNDS…

  • If the smoke alarm sounds, GET OUT AND STAY OUT. Never go back inside for people or pets.
  • If you have to escape through smoke, GET LOW AND GO under the smoke to your way out.
  • CALL the fire department from outside your home.

If you want to learn more about fire escape planning and more fire prevention tips, Click the link below.

https://www.nfpa.org/fpw

References
1 – National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA)